How to get protein when you have meat aversions

How do you get enough protein when you don’t eat meat?

This is a question our vegetarian and vegan friends get asked all the damn time, and I don’t know a single plant-based person who isn’t sick to death of explaining quinoa and lentils to curious carnivores deprived of access to common sense or Google.

When you’re pregnant and not eating meat—whether by choice or because of extreme aversions to flesh in all forms— it’s the same story, only with a few fun twists.

First, everyone and their unqualified coworker cares about what you put in your mouth, like all of a sudden when you became a vessel for new life you became public property to be fondled and judged indiscriminately for all of your choices.

Second, there are professionals asking you how you’re doing, diet-wise, on a near weekly basis, and in my experience most of them have extremely high standards for the amount of protein they want you consuming. I’ve heard quotas between 80-100 grams of protein per day while pregnant. As a point of reference, that’s:

  • 13-16 eggs (6g per egg)
  • 6-8 cups of black beans (12g per cup)
  • 10-12 cups of quinoa (8g per cup)
  • 4-5 scoops of protein powder (20g per scoop)

In other words, A LOT OF FOOD.

Third, if you have meat aversions or are experiencing pregnancy nausea, you probably also hate quinoa and eggs and black beans and other typical, healthy, non-meat sources of protein.

What’s a well-meaning, potato-chip craving pregnant woman to do? (Besides, of course, posting pictures of beautiful salads you’ll never eat to Instagram to prove what a #fitpregnancy you’re having. All’s fair when you’re cooking a human, folks).

I’ve spent quite a bit of time trying to crack this code, mostly so I could get back to my potato chips without further interruptions. Here are my four ninja ways to get protein into the kinds of foods you’re likely willing to eat, especially during nausea-time.

Sorry, plant-based friends, these involve sneaky animal products; you’re on your own for getting up to that 80-100g threshold.

This seems like a good time to insert my eternal disclaimer: I am not qualified to tell you how to be healthy, during pregnancy or not during pregnancy. Ask someone who is. 

Add collagen to your beverages

Whatever it is you’re drinking, add collagen. I find it works really well in lemonade and limeade (two drinks I could reliably stomach during first trimester). There’s no flavor change, and you turn your empty-calorie drink into 11 grams of protein.

how to get more protein when you have pregnancy meat aversions

Now that I’m able to drink coffee again, I have been adding collagen into my coffee, and that is similarly tasteless and effortless and also makes my hair ah-mazing.

how to get protein when you have pregnancy meat aversions

If you’re getting most of your hydration from non-water sources (I certainly was during first trimester, when water was right up there with raw chicken) you could easily hit your 80-100g goal on just boosted beverages alone.

Progress toward your goal: 10% for each drink.

Cook your rice in bone broth

There was a period of time when steamed white rice and soy sauce was all I could muster, and it drove my husband crazy that our baby’s earliest development was fueled by nutritionally vacant calories and sodium.

I called it survival.

We compromised: he made me rice in bone broth, and as long as I didn’t witness it, I could douse that rice in enough soy sauce that I never knew the difference. Based on my casual googling, I *think* a cup of rice cooked in bone broth has ~9g of protein. That’s about twice what you’ll get from rice cooked in water.

Progress toward your goal: 9%

Whip some collagen into your cream cheese or potato soup or other white semi-solid food

My first pregnancy, bagels and cream cheese were my jam. During the first few weeks of my second pregnancy, I only ate potato soup. Specifically, this potato soup:

how to get protein during pregnancy meat aversions

Needless to say both foods are on my no-fly list now, but they are both excellent vehicles for a dose of collagen. Just stir or mix a scoop, or a handy travel pack, into whatever soup or spread you’re able to stomach, and boost the protein by 11g.

It also works great in yogurt, if you’re into that.

Progress toward your goal: 10% for each boosted white food

Make homemade gummies, or get someone to make you some

Photo: Fitful Focus

Sour or gummy candy was surprisingly helpful for me with managing nausea, especially on the go; even just a quick sugar boost or something to suck on would get me through some rough moments. There are tons of easy, DIY home-made gummy candy recipes out there on the internet; this one from Nicole looks especially delicious. And because they include gelatin, they have protein in them!

Progress toward your goal: 5% for ~15 gummies (not much, but hey, candy)

 

And there you have it. If you strategically combine these tactics over the course of the day, you can get away with eating whatever you can keep down, and also supplying your baby with the amount of protein your caregivers recommend. Plus, of course, all of the other health benefits of collagen, gelatin, and bone broth: healthier and stronger skin and nails, healthier and more flexible joints, and improved athletic performance. Those are all major side benefits to the very basic goal of getting enough protein, especially during a time in your life when your rapidly changing body seems to serve up fresh surprises and betrayals with every new day.

I will say, too, that my sudden reliance on collagen for protein has my skin and hair looking radiant. Especially for winter.

If you’re ready to hop on the collagen wagon, you can save 20% at Great Lakes Gelatin with the code GLGLife20, valid until 3/15/18.

This post is sponsored by Great Lakes Gelatin in partnership with Fit Approach and the #SweatPink community. All opinions are my own. I so appreciate your support of the brands who partner with my first baby, Fit Approach. Thank you. <3 

The really miraculous thing about creating a human

I used to think that growing a baby from zero to 8 pounds of real human being was a miracle. But you know what’s really miraculous about biology and parenting?

How fast you forget the hard parts: how quickly the sleepless nights, the zombie days, and the confusion about how to do the most mundane things—like cutting their nails or feeding them—fades into distant memory.

 

Ain’t that the truth

My daughter is almost two, and I’ve already forgotten the infant months so thoroughly that I struggle to buy baby gifts for friends welcoming new little ones. Beyond that, I can’t even really piece together what I might need for this new life I’m growing (baby boy coming June 2018, what what!). And even if I could remember, I’m sure whatever I did the first time around could easily be improved on.

While I might not remember what nose bulb worked best for us, I am still overwhelmed and confused by the sheer sensory overload of all the baby products on the market. In fact, I don’t know what half of them even do. So when Babylist offered me a chance to try their new Hello Baby Box, a free gift for parents who create a new registry on Babylist  (yes, a free gift, just for making yourself a gift list, #signmeup), I was all over it.

I created a registry immediately, something I hadn’t done with my daughter, because, to be honest, I had zero idea what to even put on a registry. I relied on gifts and crossed my fingers we’d be prepared enough. Needless to say, that haphazard approach translated into a lot of last minute, panicked trips to the store and rush shipping orders as we tried to fill in the many holes in our baby product arsenal.

This time around, I’m more organized, and I’m so proud of myself. I gave my memory a jumpstart with some of these registry ideas, and browsed some of my favorite mom blogs to help round out my registry. (Fun fact: Babylist has a bookmarklet that you can use to add any product, from any site, to your registry. It’s like pinning a picture from your browser. It’s SO easy and I love how efficient it is; ain’t nobody got time to keep track of multiple registries at multiple stores).

Creating my registry helped trigger my memory of what those early days were like, and what products were truly lifesavers vs those that ended up being money down the drain. Baby Merlin Sleep Sack? Send me a half dozen in each size. Skimpily-proportioned swaddle blankets? Hard pass.

My growing list of must-haves has gotten me excited in a whole new way about welcoming a baby boy into our home; it’s like a digital version of nesting, as I think through what we’ll need and what will make our lives easier after we bring him home.

You can check out my registry here (hint hint 😉 ) and also create your own, or browse sample registries if you’re looking for gift ideas or things you might need yourself.  

My Hello Baby Box is full of new-to-me products to try out, including everything from nipple ointment (so necessary) to those cute little “I’m X months old!” stickers you see attached to babies all over Instagram.

I didn’t even know where to get these stickers last time!

 

I’m really excited about all the samples I get to try with Moonshadow (his in-utero nickname, we’re not that hippie, thanks), from a little device that helps them pass gas (hoping and praying this is a miracle-worker) to $50 of free babysitting on Urbansitter. Yes, you read that right, $50. F yeah. Urbansitter is where I found my daughter’s nanny so I’m a huge fan of the platform and of course I am a huge fan of anything that puts a dent in my babysitting bill and gives me more time for myself.

Presents!!

There are also breastfeeding supplies, boogie wipes to keep in your purse, and lots more significant discounts on clothes and other gear—basically everything from necessary to fun.

The Hello Baby Box is such a genius idea especially for first time moms, when often you don’t know what you don’t know, and might need some expert guidance on sorting through the profusion of baby products on the market. It’s more or less what some of my mama friends did for me when I was pregnant with my daughter, sending me glamorous things like lanolin and gel pads. I had no idea what those were for … but I quickly learned, and quickly started resupplying in bulk.

I can’t wait to go into round two a little more seasoned, a little more prepared, and with a few secret weapons in my back pocket.

To qualify for your Hello Baby Box, register here with Babylist.

This post is sponsored by Babylist, but if you know me at all, you know my general confusion about parenting and love of bookmarklets and efficiency are entirely my own. I so appreciate your support of the brands who partner with the Sweat Pink community!

Limits are so last year

gixo iamlimitless

When we first got married, one of the ways that I could reliably frustrate my husband was by being overly optimistic about timing. For example, if I was out to dinner with friends and our food hadn’t arrived yet, I’d tell him I’d be home in about 30 minutes. That estimate totally covered time to eat, pay the bill, get another drink (or two?) and of course the one hour plus commute home from San Francisco.

In other words, I was 100% dishonest. It came from a well-intentioned place of not wanting to let him down in the moment: saying “I’ll be home in 30 minutes” sounds so much better than “at least 3 hours from now, and that’s if the after dinner cocktails aren’t super delicious, and if the train schedule improbably works in my favor.” Of course my lie would come back to bite me in the ass when it was inevitably revealed, but that was a future problem that I could avoid for, well, another 30 minutes.

It’s not a respectful way to treat your partner, consistently and knowingly offering alternative facts about your plans.

My habitual tardiness may be a silly example of how well our culture teaches us to fudge or obscure any news that we fear might be poorly received. (Just look at how many women intensely identified with Cat Person).  I know I’m guilty of dissembling to maintain (an imagined?) social good all the time, for matters mundane and trivial.

In recent years, that unwillingness to put others out has manifested more in form of not asking for what I need, because the idea of either inconveniencing someone, or feeling as though I’m asking permission, feels alternately uncomfortable or stifling. And since I’m at a life stage when I need help more than ever—toddler mom, knocked up, full time job—not asking for support means I’m not showing up for myself. I’m putting up walls and limits where they don’t belong. I’m sacrificing my own health and well-being for … what, exactly?

This year, even though all the cool kids agree that resolutions are dumb, I’m using the new year as an opportunity to reflect and reset. This year, I want to reassert myself. To make space for me without guilt or excuses. To ask for the support I need instead of hoping it will be offered.
sweatpink iamlimitless gixo
In 2018, I recognize that the limits I saw on what I could achieve and who I could be were self-inflicted. In 2018 I choose to leave behind those restrictions. I choose to be limitless. The decisions and sacrifices I will make this year will be thoughtful and proactive, not reactionary or fear-driven.
I’m going into this a realist. I know my toddler and my unborn child’s needs will ultimately come first, but from here on out, that’s an approach I choose instead of a condition I submit to.
sweatpink lovetabio
In 2018 I show up for myself, without reservation. Without apology.  Without regret. With honesty. With full presence.  With an eye to the big picture.
sweatpink iamlimitless gixofit
Also, I’m going to stop reading the news so damn much. Not helpful.
This year, in partnership with Gixo, we choose to leave behind all that doesn’t serve us, and to declare #IAmLimitless. Join us for community support in achieving your goals this year, and doing more than you ever dreamed possible. 

 

 

I’m not a runner, but I’m grateful to run

I participated in a turkey trot on Thanksgiving, like I’ve done for the last eight years, but this year was different. In past years, I’ve gone with family, and our entourage is always replete with strollers and babies and grandparents and a pack of dogs. Our trot is more of a stroll; I usually sip coffee the whole way and we’re habitually at the back of the pack.

This year was different. I ran a 5-mile Turkey Trot with friends. (Well, they actually ran way faster than me, so I did most of it with temporary, pace-matched buddies from among the thousands who participated.

As I was running, I overheard snippets of conversations from the walkers I passed. Words like “I wish I were a runner, but…” or “I just can’t get into running…” or “Running just isn’t something I enjoy …”. I didn’t hear the tail end of any of those sentences but I didn’t need to, because they’re all sentiments I’ve spoken, many a time, during many a 5K stroll or while cheering at many a finish line for friends’ races.

I still don’t consider myself a runner. My ‘running’ happens in fits and starts and is punctuated by momentary highs, rookie mistakes. and lapses of activity. I’m slow. I still take walk breaks and I don’t really see my leisurely pace as something that needs a fix or an upgrade. But I’m beyond proud of myself for running those five miles on Thursday, and beyond grateful that I was able to.

During the moments when I ran alone, I kept thinking about my grandma, who passed away just a year and a half ago, and who had lost her mobility, slowly and begrudgingly, over the course of 30-some years. She was a fighter and resisted her loss of mobility longer than most humans would have endured. She never complained or let herself wallow in self-pity. She was always her witty, sharp self up until the end.

Though she never spoke to me about her feelings about being disabled, I have no doubt that she would have jumped at the chance to be able to walk or run even a few steps. And in her honor I was grateful to join the thousands of runners and walkers and babies in strollers and families in our course around downtown Austin on the most perfect, clear, sunny day, and relish the opportunity I have to move in any way I choose.

I actually didn’t get a time for this race – my chip never picked up any activity (??)  but I swear, I did the whole thing!

Even if I don’t really like running. Even if I’m not a runner. Even if my friend’s dad who power-walked the course finished just 10 minutes after I did. (No joke, he’s a machine). No matter what, I’m so glad that I can choose to run. That walking or running is available to me, and that I’m no longer the person offering the “I would like to be a runner…” excuse.

 

What new moms actually need

Over at Fit Approach, we’re in full-on holiday planning, so I’ve been thinking a lot about gifts. It’s too early, I know—I shudder to think I’m contributing to the holidays happening earlier every year trend—but I guess I am. Oops. This is sort of a holiday gift guide but really it’s a primer on what to give your mom friend, especially your new mom friend, for any occasion.

Don’t get her a stroller or baby clothes or anything that’s “for her” but really for the baby. Get her some of these things instead.

Below are the items that transformed my postpartum life. Most of these took me plenty of trial and error to figure out, so consider this your cheatsheet for what’s actually going to improve her life.

Wireless headphones

There’s no way to say this gently, so I’m just going to say it: sometimes momlife is really, really boring. You may be watching a butterfly mobile, pushing a swing, or inspecting individual pieces of bark at the playground for what feels like an eternity. Listening to podcasts and audiobooks has been a sanity saver for me, and I wish I had started doing it back when Mac was super new and I spent my whole life nursing and changing diapers. Next time, I’ll know.

I rely on my trusty wireless headphones for everything. Wires are just a no-go with a grabby baby and a chronic shortage of hands. If you follow me on the internet you know that my Aftershokz are my constant companions – they are literally the best headphones I’ve ever owned. And they make everything from conference calls to running to boring momlife moments better.

A workout app that helps her feel connected

 

I’ve been very honest about my postpartum fitness journey, and how long it took me to find a way to fit it all in. I’m still working on that. But my ace in the hole lately, something I wish I’d had available to me back when I was on a tight breastfeeding tether, was Gixo. It’s a workout app that I actually like (this is a big deal, people), primarily because of the built-in social interactions and accountability. The classes are live so the instructor is talking to you the whole time, encouraging you, even video chatting with you during water breaks.

I use it after Mac goes to bed, or I’ll even pop into a 15 minute class while she’s busy identifying every rock at the park. Even though I know the instructor can’t see me (unless I opt to share my camera during water breaks), knowing she’s there leading the class and hearing her provide feedback in real time makes me work harder to avoid getting ‘caught’ slacking. Silly, I know, but so effective. Without the live accountability, there is NO WAY IN HELL I would ever decide to do a workout, alone in my house, after she goes to bed, when all I really want to do is collapse on my couch and stare vacantly into space.

Instead, I do a Gixo workout or two, then dive back into work, reenergized by an evening dose of endorphins.

Get one month free plus 20% off here.

 

A cell phone wallet

We made these adhesive wallets for BlogFest this year, and this simple little gadget has been life-changing for me. When you’re swapping bags all the time, from diaper bag to purse to just cramming what you need in your pockets, it’s easy to forget the things you actually need. I keep my baseline essentials—ID and credit card—in my cell phone wallet, which means all I have to do is grab my phone and, even if I do no other purse swapping, I can make it through just about any day. No unloading my wallet, no collecting loose cards or items, and no forgetting things in random pockets.

We have these cute little adhesive ones for just $3; here are some fancier ones:

A backpack she’ll want to use as a purse

 

The thing about momlife is that there are never enough hands to go around. Having a purse over one shoulder only complicates the whole juggling situation. I’ve been on team backpack for years, but becoming a parent made my commitment rock solid.

I bought this backpack as a diaper bag originally, but it has since morphed ito my purse. I get a ridiculous number of compliments on it, from people who are not parents, and who are shocked to discover it’s a diaper bag. That means you get all the pros of a diaper bag (hello, pockets and easy clean!) with none of the drawbacks.

Here are some of my favorite backpack options:

Momlife friendly athleisure

Joggers
Can we say elastic waist? I recommend joggers that are gray or heathered rather than black; they are less likely to show spit up, food, dirt and other substances she’ll find herself smeared with than a pure black pair would.

Here are some of my faves:

Tops with that are cut generously around her belly.

It’s nice to have some breathing room around the belly. IT takes weeks, or months, for new moms to not look pregnant any more. Bonus points if theyr’e nursing friendly, easy to clean, AND don’t show spit up.

These are some gems:

 

A cute pair of sneakers

 

Picking shoes out for someone else is hard, but I had to include this one because once you start dressing for mom life, it’s a slippery slope into pajamas all day and mom jeans (and I don’t mean the cool hipster kind). Having a cute pair of sneakers is a perfect way to be comfortable and able to chase around toddlers / walk around with a baby in a carrier all day without feeling like a slob. I’m a die hard Converse fan, and I also have a (stupid expensive) pair of slip-ons that I bought years ago and have been one of my best cost-per-wear purchases (what a relief!).

Why not one of these pairs?

What do you think? What’s your go-to gift for new moms?